Part II of The End of the Mexican Road

Throughout the past 6 months, things have been happening in my life and with Addison that I find myself hesitant to talk about in this blog. It just seems so gory and personal. I imagine that I will write with full honesty for my book, and then once it’s published and released to the world, I can only hope that my visceral story details will bring insight, smiles, relief, understanding and perhaps a feeling of ‘not being alone in this crazy world’ to my readers.

But perhaps I will never get so real with the faceless crowd. Perhaps it’s better to keep some semblance of a wall up.

All of that being said, my inability to write completely honestly makes it hard to write about what happened next after my arrival to Playa del Carmen.

I left off with the story of Watson and I in a bar, just after I had taken my pregnancy test and thought surely the double lines were really a single line with a very faint second line…

Addison would be arriving to visit me in Playa del Carmen, in just two days. He would stay in town with me for 4 days and then I would continue south into Belize and the rest of Central of America.

“It is HOT TODAY…” I exclaimed, as Watson and I walked out to a cafe for breakfast the next day.

“Jeez, it’s only spring,” Watson commented. “Wait’ll it hits summer here!”

“Thanks but no thanks. This is bad enough for me.”

The sounds of our footsteps scuffing on the pavement and the occasional scooter passing us filled the muggy air. I had been feeling incredibly sensitive to the heat, and my nausea was increasing. I felt slightly ill all day every day.

I didn’t like the sound of hearing myself complain about the heat constantly, but it just seemed truly unbearable to me. By 10 am, the best I could do was hide in Watson’s room, his fan oscillating in a lonely manner above my head.

I felt a growing sense of dread at Addison’s arrival. I hoped being face to face would clear up some of the inexplicable feelings of panic I was having about our relationship. But at the same time it didn’t really matter. We would be together for a few days, and then once I again I would hit the road and we wouldn’t see eachother for a couple more months.

“Addison’s coming soon,” Watson said. “You excited?”

I sighed. “Yeah…”

He snorted. “You don’t sound very excited!”

“I am excited,” I allowed. “But also kind of dreading it. I’m going to have to live with the things he’s decided he needs to do while I’m away, and I’m just not handling it very gracefully.”

It was so strange to be eating breakfast side by side with other white people. Australian, English, American, French.

Why in the world would anyone want to come here for vacation? I caught myself thinking, as I looked around at all of the tourists. It’s hot, crowded, smells weird…

I stopped my thoughts.

Jeez, what is wrong with me? Why am I getting so down on Mexico?

I had begun to dread the thought of continuing my cycle tour in Central America. Cycle touring in Mexico had not been nearly as enjoyable as my cycle tour across the U.S., and I had no illusions that Central American roads and cities would be much better–or at all cooler. If anything, it was just going to get more and more hot the further south I went.

I was fantasizing about mountains, cool spring breezes drifting through pine needles, chickadees singing, their voices carrying through the forest dreamily.

“So when do you head to Alaska?” I asked Watson. He was leaving Playa del Carmen soon, and going to work on a fishing boat in some incredibly tiny town in Alaska.

“I gave the guys at the brewery my 2 months notice almost a month ago,” Watson said. He had moved down to Playa to help start a brewery with a couple of Argentinian guys who were friends with the owner of the Thirsty Planet Brewery in Austin where Watson had been working before. “But they still haven’t gotten my replacement down here to start training. I told ’em they’d better get their shit together, ’cause come the end of this month I am outta here!” He cut through the air with his hand, indicating a swift exit.

Watson was as keen to get out of Mexico as I was, except he was headed North and I was headed… South.

I sighed. “I feel ya.”

He shook his head, grinning humorlessly. “Yeah I SAY that… but really, if they do need me to stay longer, I probably will. I couldn’t leave them high and dry like that.” He sucked in some smoothie noisily and banged the cup down. “But goddamit guys, get your shit together!” He laughed.

Before I knew it, Friday March 18th had arrived, and I was clinging to Watson for dear life on the back of his motorcycle as we whipped through the sunny, Playa del Carmen traffic on our way to the Cancun airport.

Along the way, we stopped to see Pescadores, the brewery where Watson worked.

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Boxes of Pescadores beer
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Watson being photogenic

Once we arrived at the airport, Watson dropped me off and headed back to get some work done. I wandered around the airport, trying to figure out where to wait for arrivals.

I waited for what felt like a long time, watching white tourist after white tourist emerge from the arrivals area, looking dazed, confused, excited, or all of the above. I was nervous in a weird, not-very-fun way.

I’m not sure if this is a Mexican thing, but the screens that would have told me when the various flights were arriving, were inside the set of sliding, double doors that passengers were constantly exiting out of, but through which I was not supposed to go through.

I stood as close as I could to the doors to try and catch sight of Addison’s flight number on the screen inside, but finally I gave up and asked a guard if I could go in to look at the screen. He went to look at the computer for me and came back, telling me the flight number was not listed on the arrival screen.

“It does not mean that flight is not arriving,” he told me, “it’s just not on the screen.”

I nodded in confusion. How am I supposed to know if Addison’s flight is arriving at all then? I wondered, feeling irked.

But then, as I was being led to a desk to try and find out more, a tall, bearded, viking looking man emerged from the crowd.

“There you are!” I cried, before I buried my face in Addison’s big chest.

We made our way out to the bus area, paying an extravagant amount for a tiny bottle of water (I had forgotten to bring any sustenance with me). It was nice to see Addison, but also kind of awkward. I felt like there was a big, hairy gorilla standing between us, with a bad case of flatulence. I tried to pretend the gorilla wasn’t there, and smiled at Addison, who smiled back.

We took a bus back to Playa del Carmen, and the whole time I tried not to talk about the things that were disturbing me so deeply. They were the sort of things that I could easily convince myself I was making up.

We were staying at an air bnb apartment near downtown Playa.

I feel such an overwhelming sense of nausea and a retchfulness (no, that is not a word–yes, I made it up) when I remember that apartment and the bathroom…

It’s a big reason why I’ve procrastinated on writing this bit of the story, because it happens at this retchful apartment…

I’m going to get through this section really fast, before I throw up, so bear with me… (also, I will not reread to spell check certain sections, so I apologize in advance for grammatical errors)

As in many toilets in Mexico, we were asked not to flush the toilet paper. So imagine a hot, not-well-ventilated bathroom with a trash can full of poopy and peepee covered toilet paper. Add the distinct aroma of the blue chemical water that filled the toilet itself, and evil smelling chemical deodorizers hanging off the toilet, and voila…! You have the perfect recipe for never wanting to go into the bathroom.

If I absolutely had to get in there, I would pull my pants down before entering, and then plug my nose throughout the transaction. Afterwards I would hurl myself out of the bathroom, wheezing and gagging and jamming my face out of a window.

Addison was only going to be in Playa del Carmen for 4 days. So during this time we had to connect (since we wouldn’t be seeing eachother for another 2 months while I cycled across Central America), work out the status of our relationship, process, and also try to enjoy ourselves.

We visited the ocean everyday, ate at restaurants and ice cream shops, played music with Watson out on the beach, I took Addison to drink his first fresh coconut from a street vendor and scoop the sweet, juicy meat out after they split it in two for him, we spent hours crying and processing in our apartment and then, the day before Addison’s flight back to Austin, we also decided I should take another pregnancy test.

Watson was visiting, noodling around on Addison’s guitar, while I walked down the street to buy another pregnancy test. This time I knew what it was called, and did not have much difficultly in procuring one.

When I got back to to the apartment I looked at the two men, who were looking back at me.

“It’s a moment of truth guys,” I told them.

Addison looked anxious.

I unpacked the pregnancy test, plugged my nose, and ducked into the fumes-of-hell bathroom.

When I emerged, it was with feelings I had not expected…

I felt guilty.

I felt like maybe I had ruined Addison life.

I thought maybe he would resent me forever, and our relationship would crumble because of it.

“It’s positive,” I told the guys, who had both stopped what they were doing to stare at me.

I think Watson crowed.

But I was looking at Addison’s face. He had something like horror written across it.

I handed him the test stick with the two lines on it.

“I read the first pregnancy test wrong,” I told them.

Watson stared at me. “You read the first one WRONG?? How do you even do that??”

“I don’t know!” I cried. “I’ve never taken a pregnancy test before! I just assumed it was cheap, faulty, didn’t work well… I thought the ‘second line’ wasn’t really a line!”

Addison was gazing down at the test stick in silence. Than he started googling images for “a positive results pregnancy test”.

“I purposely bought a different brand of test this time,” I told them both. “And seeing a different one do exactly the same thing made me realize that I just got the first one wrong.”

I went and sat down on the couch with Watson. “Watson!” I yelled. “I’m pregnant! What are we going to do??”

He gaped at me. “Why are you coming over to me?? You should go to Addison! I’m getting out of here.”

I looked at Addison. “I’m giving Addison space. He’s in shock. And I feel bad for him.”

“YOU feel bad for ADDISON??” Watson gawped.

“He’s younger than me,” I said simply. “I’m more ready for the idea of being pregnant than he is.”

During all of this, Addison was occasionally grunting, agreeing or disagreeing with something that was being said, but I don’t really remember much else coming out of him.

Watson packed up and headed for the door. “You should name the kid Marcelles,” he said definitively, before walking out.

Addison chuckled dryly. “We’ll consider it. See ya later dude.”

We looked at eachother in the silence that followed. “Holy shit.”2016-03-17 07.51.24

I’m sorry to say, but there’ll have to be a Part III… maybe a Part IV??

3 thoughts on “Part II of The End of the Mexican Road

  1. That is exiting – looking forward to a novel frrom you 🙂
    please give me your address, I have a small gift for you – anf Americans to take it to California next week 🙂

    Love and hugs
    Bente

    1. Well that’s the plan! You are an active part of the creation of my first book! 🙂

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